Everything is People

Everything here is my design

17,125 notes

If a Disney princess had night terrors, the story of Sansa Stark might be what woke her up screaming. Often overlooked in favor of her killer kid sister, the elder Stark sibling has had all her illusions about the world, and her safety in it, shattered. But her quiet, innate political shrewdness and emotional strength have enabled her to survive in a royal court that likely would have cost every other member of her family their heads. She’s the show’s best-kept secret.
Rollingstone about Sansa Stark in their list of top 40 game of thrones characters. Sansa is number 4. x (via tomlincum)

(via bespectacledbibliophile)

1,277 notes

The truth is, everyone likes to look down on someone. If your favorites are all avant-garde writers who throw in Sanskrit and German, you can look down on everyone. If your favorites are all Oprah Book Club books, you can at least look down on mystery readers. Mystery readers have sci-fi readers. Sci-fi can look down on fantasy. And yes, fantasy readers have their own snobbishness. I’ll bet this, though: in a hundred years, people will be writing a lot more dissertations on Harry Potter than on John Updike. Look, Charles Dickens wrote popular fiction. Shakespeare wrote popular fiction - until he wrote his sonnets, desperate to show the literati of his day that he was real artist. Edgar Allan Poe tied himself in knots because no one realized he was a genius. The core of the problem is how we want to define “literature”. The Latin root simply means “letters”. Those letters are either delivered - they connect with an audience - or they don’t. For some, that audience is a few thousand college professors and some critics. For others, its twenty million women desperate for romance in their lives. Those connections happen because the books successfully communicate something real about the human experience. Sure, there are trashy books that do really well, but that’s because there are trashy facets of humanity. What people value in their books - and thus what they count as literature - really tells you more about them than it does about the book.
Brent Weeks (via victoriousvocabulary)

1,395 notes

omniastudios:

Alright our lovely little witches, here is your chance to win some ghostly goodies from Omnia Oddities!
Win the following items:· One (1) “The Séance” sterling silver amulet   with natural moonstone on 24” sterling chain.· Two (2) Planchette Omnia logo tees in sizes   s - xxxl. (One for you, one for a friend you tag.  If you do not tag a friend only ONE shirt will be  awarded.)· One (1) “The Séance” clear resin bangle in size  small or standard.The Rules:· You must reblog and FOLLOW.· Do not delete the original text.· No giveaway only blogs.· Must be atleast 18 years old or have parent or   guardian’s permission to enter.· Tag a friend. (optional)Giveaway ends and winner chosen at random on: 04/21/14 @ 9pm EDT.
Contest is open to all, we ship world-wide. :)
Good Luck
www.omniaoddities.com

omniastudios:

Alright our lovely little witches, here is your chance to win some ghostly goodies from Omnia Oddities!

Win the following items:
· One (1) “The Séance” sterling silver amulet
  with natural moonstone on 24” sterling chain.
· Two (2) Planchette Omnia logo tees in sizes
  s - xxxl. (One for you, one for a friend you tag.
  If you do not tag a friend only ONE shirt will be
  awarded.)
· One (1) “The Séance” clear resin bangle in size
  small or standard.

The Rules:
· You must reblog and FOLLOW.
· Do not delete the original text.
· No giveaway only blogs.
· Must be atleast 18 years old or have parent or
  guardian’s permission to enter.
· Tag a friend. (optional)

Giveaway ends and winner chosen at random on:
04/21/14 @ 9pm EDT.

Contest is open to all, we ship world-wide. :)

Good Luck

www.omniaoddities.com

698 notes

victoriousvocabulary:

FRIGUS
[noun]
1. cold, coldness, coolness, chilliness.
2. the cold of winter; winter; frost.
3. the coldness of death; death.
4. a chill, fever.
5. a cold shudder which is produced by fear a cold region, place, area or spot (figuratively).
6. inactivity, indolence, slowness (figuratively).
7. a cold reception, indifference; a chilly demeanour.
Etymology: Latin, from Proto-Indo-European*sriHgos-. Cognate with Ancient Greek ῥῖγος (rhigos).
[a-hour - The Queen]

victoriousvocabulary:

FRIGUS

[noun]

1. cold, coldness, coolness, chilliness.

2. the cold of winter; winter; frost.

3. the coldness of death; death.

4. a chill, fever.

5. a cold shudder which is produced by fear a cold region, place, area or spot (figuratively).

6. inactivity, indolence, slowness (figuratively).

7. a cold reception, indifference; a chilly demeanour.

Etymology: Latin, from Proto-Indo-European*sriHgos-. Cognate with Ancient Greek ῥῖγος (rhigos).

[a-hour - The Queen]

517 notes

gothiccharmschool:

jacobbeahm:

m-ziliak:

Goth Problem of the Day: Seeing another goth person and going up to them to strike up a conversation and they turn out to be one of those “Gother Than Thou” types. 

Goth Problem of the Forever is more like it.

Goth Problem that I am trying, in my own small way, to STAMP OUT. The Elder Goth Cabal (which does not exist) feels that being elitist and “Gother Than Thou” at other members of our dark subculture is ridiculous, and not in a fun way.

(I actually, literally, heavy-sighed at this one)